5:17 pm - Thu, Apr 17, 2014
189 notes

Author Gabriel García Márquez Dead at 87

thatlitsite:

image

Gabriel García Márquez, the legendary Colombian novelist whose book One Hundred Years of Solitude established him as a literary giant of 20th-century literature, died on Thursday in Mexico City. He was 87.

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10:38 am - Tue, Apr 15, 2014
8 notes
I’m back!
After a pretty intense semester, it’s finally time to catch up on reading.
New buys: 
The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut: wanted to continue with Vonnegut after Slapstick, and I love this series of editions!!
On the Road by Jack Kerouac: a dose of Americana. I can’t get enough after Cormac McCarthy. It’s the “original scroll,” too, so that’s pretty exciting. 
Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein. I’ve heard again and again that it’s one of the best sci-fi books of all time, despite the movie. Probably because there’s no Denise Richards in it. 
Can’t wait.
It’s too bad that I also got into knitting recently so now I’m torn between two pastimes :(
Oh well. Vacation’s going great!

I’m back!

After a pretty intense semester, it’s finally time to catch up on reading.

New buys: 

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut: wanted to continue with Vonnegut after Slapstick, and I love this series of editions!!

On the Road by Jack Kerouac: a dose of Americana. I can’t get enough after Cormac McCarthy. It’s the “original scroll,” too, so that’s pretty exciting. 

Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein. I’ve heard again and again that it’s one of the best sci-fi books of all time, despite the movie. Probably because there’s no Denise Richards in it. 

Can’t wait.

It’s too bad that I also got into knitting recently so now I’m torn between two pastimes :(

Oh well. Vacation’s going great!

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12:55 am - Sun, Mar 16, 2014
251 notes

karamazove:

Marilyn reading

(via read-tea-breathe)

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9:54 pm - Thu, Mar 13, 2014

w-nchesters said: This is so great because I have been reluctant to start it and you’ve just convinced me to go for it

Awesome! Hope you enjoy it. Now I’m a little afraid I oversold it, but I really did like it that much! Let me know what you think after you’re done. 

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9:47 pm
2 notes

Slapstick, or Lonesome No More!: Introduction to Kurt Vonnegut

Summary: 

Two physically deformed twins (brother and sister) who share an inexplicable intellectual and emotional link are genius together, but deteriorate after a separation. They grow up separately and reunite only briefly before the world disintegrates as a result of a pandemic and the force of gravity spiralling out of control. As president, the brother attempts to combat deep-rooted American loneliness and live on after civilization quietly collapses. More.

Review:

This was the very first Vonnegut book I’ve read, and while Slaughterhouse 5 is probably the most popular starter (as far as I’ve heard) I picked this volume at complete random because Barnes & Noble didn’t have Sirens of Titan which is what I originally wanted. 

In any event, I think this was quite a stroke of luck: Slapstick, or Lonesome No More! is a semi-autobiographical work, and for someone like me, who prefers to begin everything with first principles, I think this makes for an especially great start. It gives you a sense of the author’s primary perspective before you venture off to study its other manifestations. 

I preface my further thoughts with an expression of reservation - I am reluctant to judge a man by his book. Nonetheless, to whatever extent this is true of Vonnegut is a person, I felt that his worldview was most informed by loneliness… loneliness of a very special kind, a sort of intellectual isolation which, it seems, could only be broken by his sister. With his sister dead of cancer in her forties, the novel (and the autobiographical introduction) convey the sense that her death left Vonnegut very much alone.  

This loneliness permeates every page and it translated instantly to me as the reader. I’m not quite sure how. It is somehow ingrained in the desperation of the prose, and the foolish hope and desire to well, not be lonely anymore. I was surrounded by family as I finished the novel in one sitting, but the isolation Slapstick left me with was overwhelming. Some believed this to be an overstatement, but I think the only other author who left me with such a heavy emotional burden was Dostoyevsky. I couldn’t shake it for a couple of days. It seems to me that Vonnegut is a master of meanings, conveyed with every word and phrase and period - not just broad structural and literary brushstrokes. 

I am astounded by Vonnegut’s ability to take individually absurd events and ideas and combine them into something so powerful and tremendous. I don’t know whether to let his wit make me laugh or cry. I don’t know if I’m ready for the full extent of his ability to manipulate me.

In other words, I’m in love. 

Hi ho.

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